Art

The Rocky Mountain College art program offers instruction and experience in studio and art history courses for all students at Rocky, no matter the major. The variety of classes spans the spectrum from two-dimensional to three-dimensional, from ancient art practices to the study of current trends. The art faculty teach critical thinking through analysis, criticism, the study of aesthetics, the production of original works of art, and the study of major periods in art history. Students are encouraged to explore mediums and techniques, both traditional and experimental. The faculty value ethical decision making and provide opportunities for students to volunteer in the community. Study abroad experiences are considered vital and every effort is made to provide study abroad opportunities for all Rocky students.

It is the mission of the art program to provide all students with the opportunity to enhance their creative expression through experiencing art. The faculty strive to build a strong foundation in the techniques and processes of producing visual art, to assist students in the development of their personal artistic style, to enhance students’ understanding of the role art plays in society, and to encourage students to strive for professional excellence in all their artistic endeavors.

Learning Outcomes

Students who graduate with a major in art will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of the fundamental concepts, skills, and techniques specific to the fine arts;
  2. Describe the interrelationships between the fine arts, history, and culture;
  3. Apply aesthetic judgment based upon both personal and objective criteria to critique works of art; and
  4. Employ creative processes.

Note

  1. Students with exceptional preparation in some area of art study may consult with faculty concerning substitutions or waivers of prerequisites.
  2. Independent study, directed reading, and field practica, among others, may not be taken in art until at least 15 semester hours of regular coursework have been satisfactorily completed.
  3. Internship credits may be used for no more than six semester hours of the required total for the major or minor.
  4. Art education majors must complete the professional education program for P-12 teaching. See the "Education" section of the catalog.
  5. Students wishing for more depth in a studio course may take that course a second time at a higher level, with the instructor's approval.
  6. Additional expenses for tools and materials can be expected in most art courses.

Major in Art

A minimum of 41 semester hours is required, including:
ART 101: Drawing I
ART 121: Design
ART 190: Art Seminar I
ART 220: Art History Survey I
ART 221: Art History Survey II
ART 222: Art History Survey III
ART 483: Senior Project
ART 490: Art Seminar II

Choose one of the following:
ART 243: Digital Photography
ART 247: Digital Nature Photography

Choose one of the following:
ART 250: Sculpture I
ART 251: Clay I
ART 252: Jewelry and Metalwork I

Choose one of the following:
ART 321: Topics in Art History I
ART 322: Topics in Art History II
ART 323: Topics in Art History III

The additional 12 semester hours (minimum) for the major are to be chosen in consultation with the student's academic advisor. Courses may include art courses; one business-related course (BSA 418 or BSA 425) or one foreign language; and/or internships (pass/no pass) up to six semester hours. Reminder: 12 hours of upper division art/art-related credits are required for the art major.

Major in Art Education

Requirements include a minimum of 44 semester hours, including the 41 semester hours listed under the major in art, plus ART 338. Discipline-based art education, art production, art history, aesthetics, and criticism are the areas of focus for this major. Art education majors must complete the professional education program for P-12 teaching as described in the "Education" section of the catalog.

Minor in Art

A minimum of 22 semester hours is required, including:

One of the following:
ART 101: Drawing I
ART 121: Design

All of the following:
ART 190: Art Seminar I
ART 490: Art Seminar II

One of the following:
ART 220: Art History Survey I
ART 221: Art History Survey II
ART 222: Art History Survey III

One of the following:
ART 321: Topics in Art History I
ART 322: Topics in Art History II
ART 323: Topics in Art History III

The additional 9 semester hours (minimum) for the minor are to be chosen in consultation with the student's academic advisor. Electives may include art courses; one foreign language course may be substituted for an art elective course. Participation in a Senior Show (ART 483: Senior Project - 1 hour) is encouraged, but optional. Reminder: 6 hours of upper division art/art-related credits are required for the art minor.

Minor in Art Education

Requirements include a minimum of 25 semester hours, including the 22 semester hours listed under the Minor in Art, plus ART 338. Discipline-based art education is the goal of this minor. Art education minors must complete the professional education program for P-12 teaching as described in the "Education" section of the catalog.

ART 101 - Drawing I
Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3
This foundation course explores basic drawing techniques in a variety of dry and wet drawing media. This studio course offers the student an opportunity to learn about pictures as language and expressions using the vocabulary of the elements of art: line, value, shape, form, texture, perspective, and composition. Students will create, critique, and display original works of art. Core Requirement Area: Fine Arts #2 (performance).
ART 121 - Design
Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3
This studio course closely examines both two-dimensional and three-dimensional design by studying the principles of design and the elements of art. Students will create, display, and formally present for criticism to the course academic exercises and works of art.
ART 190 - Art Seminar I
Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 2
What does it mean to be an art or art education major or minor? This course is designed to explore that question and to create community among all art students by meeting simultaneously with ART 490. Discussion, a common art project, field trips, art community service, and the starting of a résumé, a portfolio, and an artist's statement are examples of course activities and requirements. The art seminar is further enhanced by visits with a career counselor and art professionals. The course not only serves as an opportunity for self-assessment by each student, but also requires the assessment (analysis and criticism) of classmates’ and others’ artwork. Students should enroll in this course at the earliest opportunity upon declaring an art or art education major or minor.

Prerequisite: Declared art or art education major or minor
ART 215 - Creativity
Semester: Fall; Alternate years
Semester hours: 3
This course approaches creativity as a skill to develop, not as a magical gift bestowed on a few select people. The last three weeks of the course will be devoted to a large-scale project in an area chosen by the student at the time of registration. Two important elements of the course involve a specific style of journaling and a weekly artist's date. Through the activities in this course, students will bring a higher degree of creativity to their daily lives. This course may be taken either at the lower-division level or at the upper-division level, but not both. This course is cross-listed with MUS 215.
ART 220 - Art History Survey I
Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3
This is a general survey of art historical periods including the Prehistoric in Europe, the Near East, and the Americas; Ancient Egypt; the Bronze Age and Ancient Greece; the Etruscans; and the Romans. Study focuses on the materials, techniques, style, historical context, aesthetics, and criticism of this wide variety of art. Traditional art historical methods of slide lecture, discussion, written exams, and papers are de rigueur as well as exploration of relevant topics on the Internet and via the course website. Though sequential, ART 220, ART 221, and ART 222 may be taken separately.
ART 221 - Art History Survey II
Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3
This is a general survey of art historical periods including the Early Christian, Byzantine, Islamic, Early Medieval, Gothic, and Renaissance. Study focuses on the materials, techniques, style, historical context, aesthetics, and criticism of this wide variety of art. Traditional art historical methods of slide lecture, discussion, written exams, and papers are de rigueur as well as exploration of relevant topics on the Internet and via the course website. Though sequential, ART 220, ART 221, and ART 222 may be taken separately.
ART 222 - Art History Survey III
Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3
This is a general survey of art historical periods and movements during the 17th, 18th, 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries. Study focuses on the materials, techniques, style, historical context, aesthetics, and criticism of this wide variety of art. Traditional art historical methods of slide lecture, discussion, written exams, and papers are de rigueur as well as exploration of relevant topics on the Internet and via the course website. Though sequential, ART 220, ART 221, and ART 222 may be taken separately.
ART 231 - Painting I
Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3
This studio course explores techniques of oil and acrylic paints as well as mixed media. The contemporary view as well as the traditional is examined. Students will create, critique, and display original works of art.
ART 232 - Painting II
Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3
This course explores the theories and techniques of traditional watercolor painting. However, non-traditional approaches to watercolor and other types of painting, e.g., mixed media, are often introduced. Students will create, critique, and display original works of art.
ART 243 - Digital Photography
Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 3
This course introduces students to the process of digital photography. Camera handling, editing techniques, and the elements of design are covered. Students are encouraged to pursue this art form in the surrounding community and landscape.
ART 244 - Calligraphy
Semester: Fall and Spring; Alternate years
Semester hours: 3
The purpose of this course is to connect with scribes, past and present, to learn their skills and apply them today. Though immersed in art history, students of calligraphy spend most of the course studying, practicing, and laying out a variety of hands including Roman, Insular, National, Caroline, Gothic, Italian, Humanist, and post-Renaissance scripts. Traditional tool-making and usage include quill, reed, and bamboo pens and ink; other tools, media, and techniques may include brushes, steel pens, paper, papyrus, vellum, watercolor, gouache, embossing, relief printing, resist, computer-generated layouts, and more. Projects range from quotes to cards to product labels to small books. Students will create, critique, and display original works of art.
ART 247 - Digital Nature Photography
Semester: Offered at discretion of department
Semester hours: 3
This course explores the practice of digital photography as it relates to the field of nature photography. Camera selection, technology, and use are covered, as are field practices, editing techniques, elements of composition, and trip planning. Students are encouraged to pursue this art form in the surrounding area including a trip to Yellowstone National Park. Students will create, critique, and present original works of art.
ART 250 - Sculpture I
Semester: Fall and Spring; Alternate years
Semester hours: 3
Students will explore the third dimension by creating artworks in a variety of materials, such as clay, plaster, wood, metal, found objects, and mixed media. Processes and techniques include modeling, carving, lost wax casting, and construction. Students will create, critique, and display original works of art. Students will also learn about the relationship between sculpture and its art historical context.
ART 251 - Clay I
Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3
Students in this studio course create original works of art using hand-building techniques such as pinching, slab-building, coiling, and modeling (sculpting). Wheel-throwing is also introduced. Students are encouraged to explore the use of design elements in the clay medium. They are also expected to be able to identify and articulate qualities that characterize notable ceramic works by studying both modern and historic ceramic pieces. Students will create, critique, and display original works of art.
ART 252 - Jewelry and Metalwork I
Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 3
This course is an introduction to basic jewelry and metalworking processes and techniques, such as lost wax casting, raising, forging, fabrication, and lapidary work. Copper, brass, bronze, sterling silver, and semi-precious stones are commonly used; more expensive materials may be used if the student can afford them. Functional and non-functional objects may be made with an emphasis on craftsmanship and aesthetics. Designs from nature, art history, and contemporary culture are encouraged. Students will create, critique, and display original works of art. ART 352 is a continuation of ART 252.
ART 299 - Independent Study
Semester: Offered at discretion of department
Semester hours: 1-3
This course allows a superior student to devise and pursue independent study in an area agreed upon in consultation with, and supervised by, a faculty member. Students should be either a major or minor and have a cumulative GPA of 3.00 or greater.
ART 301 - Drawing II
Semester: Offered at discretion of department
Semester hours: 3
This is primarily a life-drawing class. Working mainly from the human nude and from animals, the student is allowed to explore techniques and create drawings in dry and wet media. "Nature as teacher" is the academic approach in live-model sessions; however, other drawing approaches, subject matter, and advanced techniques may be explored. Students will create, critique, and display original works of art.
Prerequisite: ART 101
ART 315 - Creativity
Semester: Fall; Alternate years
Semester hours: 3
This course approaches creativity as a skill to develop, not as a magical gift bestowed on a few select people. The last three weeks of the course will be devoted to a large-scale project in an area chosen by the student at the time of registration. Two important elements of the course involve a specific style of journaling and a weekly artist's date. Through the activities in this course, students will bring a higher degree of creativity to their daily lives. This course may be taken either at the lower-division level or at the upper-division level, but not both. This course is cross-listed with MUS 315.
ART 317 - Art, Art History, and Archaeology
Semester: Summer
Semester hours: 3
Students participate in the various aspects of archaeology at a particular locale – in the classroom and on site. Areas of study include, but are not limited to, the following: excavating, drafting, conservation, pottery analysis, history, art history, and cataloging. In addition to working at an excavation, students will explore other historical sites and museums.
ART 321 - Topics in Art History I
Semester: Fall and Spring; Alternate years
Semester hours: 3
Choosing from the prehistoric (as early as 40,000 BCE) through the Gothic (as late as 1500 CE), this course may explore such topics as Ancient Egypt, Bronze Age and Classical Greece, Imperial Rome, or Medieval Europe. Study focuses on art materials, techniques, style, prehistorical and historical context, aesthetics, and criticism. While traditional methods of studying art history are used (e.g., slide lectures, discussion, written exams, and papers), students are expected to authentically replicate an objet d'art from the studied historical periods as a major project with presentation. This course (same number, different topic) may be taken twice, with up to six credits counting toward the art/art education major or minor requirements.
ART 322 - Topics in Art History II
Semester: Fall and Spring; Alternate years
Semester hours: 3
The topic for this course is chosen from Western artistic traditions ranging from the Renaissance, Baroque, Rococo, the 19th, or the 20th centuries. Study focuses on art materials, techniques, styles, historical contexts, aesthetics, and criticism. While traditional methods of studying art history are used (e.g., slide lectures, discussion, written exams, and papers), students are expected, as a research project, to authentically replicate an objet d'art from a historical period or produce an original work of art done “in the style of” a major period of art history. This course (same number, different topic) may be taken twice, with up to six credits counting toward the art or art education major or minor requirements.
ART 323 - Topics in Art History III
Semester: Fall and Spring; Alternate years
Semester hours: 3
This is a study of the peoples and their art from the non-European traditions. Topics vary and may include Native American cultures such as the Anasazi, Mogollon, or Mimbres and/or the art of Africa or Asia, among others. Study focuses on art materials, techniques, style, prehistorical and historical context, aesthetics, and criticism. While traditional methods of studying art history are used (e.g., slide lectures, discussion, written exams, and papers), students are expected to authentically replicate an objet d'art from the studied historical periods as a major project with presentation. This course (same number, different topic) may be taken twice, with up to six credits counting toward the art or art education major or minor requirements.
ART 331 - Painting III
Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3
This studio course continues the exploration of techniques of oil, acrylic, and mixed mediums. It allows students more time to develop techniques and pursue individual projects. The student and instructor will develop a mutually agreeable plan of study at the beginning of the semester. Students will create, critique, and display original works of art. Usually, ART 331 is offered concurrently with ART 231.
Prerequisite: ART 231
ART 332 - Painting IV
Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3
This studio course allows the student to continue exploration in the watercolor medium. It allows students more time to develop techniques and pursue individual projects. The option of branching into other mediums is available near mid-semester. The student and instructor will develop a mutually agreeable plan of study at the beginning of the semester. Students will create, critique, and display original works of art. Usually, ART 332 is offered concurrently with ART 232.
Prerequisite: ART 232
ART 338 - Methods and Materials: Teaching Art in the Elementary and Secondary Schools
Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3
This course focuses on the methods and materials for teaching art in the elementary, middle, and secondary schools.
Prerequisite: admission to the teacher education program
ART 342 - Printmaking
Semester: Offered at discretion of department
Semester hours: 3
Students are introduced to basic relief printmaking, as well as techniques such as linoleum and wood cut and calligraphy. Other processes include monoprint, intaglio, silkscreen, and/or computer-generated graphics. Students will create, critique, and display original works of art.
Prerequisite: ART 101
ART 347 - Topics in Photography
Semester: Fall and Spring; Alternate years
Semester hours: 3
This course explores the methodology of digital photography as it applies to the fields of adventure/lifestyle/commercial photography. Camera selection, technology, and use are covered, as are field practices, editing techniques, and elements of composition. Students will create, critique, and present original works of art.
Prerequisite: ART 243 or ART 247
ART 350 - Sculpture II
Semester: Fall and Spring; Alternate years
Semester hours: 3
Students are allowed to pursue areas of individual interest by exploring advanced techniques and/or by expanding basic sculptural skills learned in ART 250. The student and instructor will develop a mutually agreeable plan of study at the beginning of the semester. Students will create, critique, and display original works of art.
Prerequisite: ART 250
ART 351 - Clay II
Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3
This clay class offers the student an opportunity to expand ceramic skills according to individual interests. The student and instructor will develop a mutually agreeable plan of study at the beginning of the semester. Students will create, critique, and display original works of art. Usually, ART 351 is offered concurrently with ART 251.
Prerequisite: ART 251
ART 352 - Jewelry and Metalwork II
Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 3
Students are allowed to pursue areas of individual interest by investigating advanced techniques and/or by expanding basic jewelry and metalworking skills. The student and instructor will develop a mutually agreeable plan of study at the beginning of the semester. Students will create, critique, and display original works of art. ART 352 is a continuation of, and is offered concurrently with, ART 252.
Prerequisite: ART 252
ART 450 - Internship
Semester: Offered at discretion of department
Semester hours: 1-12
This course is a guided work experience in an already established place of business. The student must arrange the internship in agreement with the instructor and the Office of Career Services. Contract is required.
Prerequisite: junior or senior standing
ART 483 - Senior Project
Semester: Offered at discretion of department
Semester hours: 1
For art majors and art education majors and minors, this course is designed to help students develop the concept, philosophy, and direction of a body of work for their senior show. Students meet with professor(s) on a weekly basis.
Prerequisite: permission of professor
ART 490 - Art Seminar II
Semester: Fall; Alternate years
Semester hours: 2
Designed for art and art education majors and minors, this course explores what it means to be an art professional. Discussion, field trips (e.g., to museums, galleries, artists' studios), art community service, and preparation of a résumé, a portfolio, an artist's statement, and preparation for senior show are the focus of the course. The art seminar is further enhanced by visits from a career counselor and art professionals. The course not only serves as an opportunity for self-assessment by each student, but also requires the assessment of classmates, the art program, and, in the case of art education majors and minors, the application of age-appropriate assessment formats. Students enrolled in ART 490 are encouraged to mentor first and second-year art and art education students.

Prerequisite: Senior status; declared art or art education major or minor
ART 499 - Independent Study
Semester: Offered at discretion of department
Semester hours: 1-3
This course allows a superior student to devise and pursue independent study in an area agreed upon in consultation with, and supervised by, a faculty member. Students should be either a major or minor and have a cumulative GPA of 3.00 or greater.
Prerequisite: junior or senior standing
BSA 418 - Entrepreneurship I
Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3
Students will learn the characteristics of successful entrepreneurs, how to seek and evaluate opportunities for new ventures, how to prepare a complete business plan, and how to plan strategies and gather resources to create business opportunities.
Prerequisite: ACC 309, BSA 303, BSA 304, BSA 311
BSA 425 - Small Business Operations
Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3
This course focuses on how owners and managers grow companies in a professional manner while maintaining the entrepreneurial spirit. Students draw from varied disciplines to create and understand strategies for building and growing a successful venture.
Prerequisite: BSA 418
ITN 131 - Beginning Italian I
Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 4
This course provides an introduction to Italian speech, language, culture, and communication through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The approach integrates culture and language with emphasis on vocabulary acquisition and basic grammatical structures. Classwork emphasizes participation, group work, and opportunities for hearing and speaking Italian.
SPN 131 - Beginning Spanish I
Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 4
This course provides an introduction to Spanish speech, language, culture, and communication through reading, writing, listening, and speaking. A culture and language-integrated approach with an emphasis on vocabulary acquisition and basic grammatical structures is used.

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