Aviation

The mission of the Rocky Mountain College aviation program is to educate and train individuals to be professionals and leaders in the aviation industry.

The aviation program provides students with the knowledge and skills required to enter the exciting world of professional aviation. Graduates are prepared to begin careers as pilots or managers in the airline business, air cargo, military, or other sectors in the aviation industry.

Flight training is conducted in Piper and Beechcraft aircraft owned by the College. Glass cockpit aircraft and sophisticated simulators are used in training to prepare graduates for competitive careers in aviation. Further training is conducted using state-of-the-art Canadair Regional Jet (CRJ) flight management system (FMS) simulation. The program emphasizes professional experiences, relevant classroom instruction, and safe flight operations that will help transition the students to a successful career after graduation.

Majors are offered in aeronautical science and aviation management, and minors are offered in aeronautical science and aircraft dispatch. The aeronautical science major combines pilot certification with studies of the air transportation operating environment. The aviation management major combines studies of aviation with business and economics. Pilot certification is elective under this major.

The minor in aeronautical science includes private pilot certification, plus the knowledge to safely and efficiently use air transportation as part of a business operation or for personal use. The aircraft dispatch minor prepares students for a career as a dispatcher, a position that shares responsibility for the movement of an airplane with the plane’s captain and handles such issues as maintenance, weight and balance, changing weather, diverts, and passenger issues.

The program emphasizes professional relationships with companies and individuals across the aviation industry and internship opportunities tailored to the desires of each individual student.

Learning Outcomes

Aeronautical Science Major
Students who graduate with a major in aeronautical science will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate attributes of an aviation professional, career planning, and understanding certification;
  2. Demonstrate understanding of aircraft design, performance, operating characteristics, and maintenance;
  3. Demonstrate understanding of aviation operations in terms of aviation safety and human factors;
  4. Demonstrate understanding of national and international aviation law, regulations, and labor issues;
  5. Demonstrate understanding of design and operations of airports, airspace, and the air traffic control system;
  6. Demonstrate understanding of meteorology and environmental issues;
  7. Apply mathematics, science, and applied sciences to aviation-related disciplines;
  8. Analyze and interpret data;
  9. Work effectively on multi-disciplinary and diverse teams;
  10. Make professional and ethical decisions;
  11. Communicate effectively, using both written and oral communication skills;
  12. Engage in and recognize lifelong learning;
  13. Assess contemporary issues;
  14. Use the techniques, skills, and modern technology necessary for professional practice;
  15. Assess the national and international aviation environment;
  16. Apply pertinent knowledge in identifying and solving problems;
  17. Apply knowledge of business sustainability to aviation issues;
  18. Meet FAA commercial pilot standards, with instrument and multi-engine ratings, and demonstrate the ability to operate in a crew environment;
  19. Demonstrate knowledge and application of aerodynamic principles.
Aviation Management Major
Students who graduate with a major in aviation management will be able to:
  1. Demonstrate attributes of an aviation professional, career planning, and understanding of certification;
  2. Demonstrate understanding of aircraft design, performance, operating characteristics, and maintenance;
  3. Demonstrate understanding of aviation operations in terms of aviation safety and human factors;
  4. Demonstrate understanding of national and international aviation law, regulations, and labor issues;
  5. Demonstrate understanding of design and operations of airports, airspace, and the air traffic control system;
  6. Demonstrate understanding of meteorology and environmental issues;
  7. Apply mathematics, science, and applied sciences to aviation-related disciplines;
  8. Analyze and interpret data;
  9. Work effectively on multi-disciplinary and diverse teams;
  10. Make professional and ethical decisions;
  11. Communicate effectively, using both written and oral communication skills;
  12. Engage in and recognize the need for lifelong learning;
  13. Assess contemporary issues;
  14. Use the techniques, skills, and modern technology necessary for professional practice;
  15. Assess the national and international aviation environment;
  16. Apply pertinent knowledge in identifying and solving problems;
  17. Apply knowledge of business sustainability to aviation issues;
  18. Communicate the principles necessary to integrate as an employee at a fixed base operations company, an airline, and an airport;
  19. Apply classroom concepts to the aviation industry through an internship.

Program Accreditation

The aeronautical science and aviation management majors are both accredited by the Aviation Accreditation Board International (AABI). There are only 26 aeronautical science programs and 31 aviation management programs worldwide accredited by AABI. The organization sets standards for all aerospace programs taught in colleges and universities around the United States and the world.

Pilot Certification

Flight education is conducted under Federal Aviation Regulation Part 141 certification. Classroom instruction is conducted on campus, and flight instruction is conducted at Flight Operations at nearby Billings Logan International Airport. Students majoring in aeronautical science may receive credit for prior learning for the private pilot certificate and the instrument rating completed prior to enrollment. Credit for other FAA certification is reviewed and determined on a case-by-case basis. Once students enroll in the aviation program, all subsequent flight instruction must be received through the Rocky Mountain College Aviation Program.

Students who have had previous private pilot training will take Private Pilot Ground School and Private Pilot Flight Lab at RMC unless they have passed the FAA Private Pilot Practical Test before arriving at RMC. Previous training will likely help the student complete the Private Pilot Flight Lab in less flight time than other students. If that training was accomplished under FAR Part 61, the student must pass a written exam or he/she will be required to take AVS 101: Private Pilot Ground School. The student will not be required to repeat any private pilot flight training. The number of students taking private pilot flight training in the fall semester may be restricted to balance classroom and flight instruction capabilities.

Medical Certification

Aeronautical science major students must obtain a minimum of a Class II FAA medical certificate prior to the start of flight training. A Class I certificate is recommended. Students minoring in aeronautical science must obtain at least a Class III FAA medical certificate, which is required for the private pilot certificate.

Program Costs

The cost of flight training is in addition to normal college tuition and fees. The fee for each flight laboratory course is payable at the time of registration. These fees are based on the cost for an average student to complete the flight instruction in the specified syllabus and include costs for FAA knowledge and flight exams. Flight lab completion may carry over from one semester to another.

Citizenship

All students must show proof of citizenship before beginning flight training. Common forms of proof of U.S. citizenship are an original birth certificate or a current passport. International students may take flight training, but must comply with procedures established by the U.S. Transportation Security Administration. Contact Flight Operations for details.

Aeronautical Science (Professional Pilot) Major

The following are required as part of the core curriculum courses:
MAT 131: Trigonometry and Applied Calculus
PSY 101: General Psychology

Choose one of the following:
PHS 101: Fundamental Physics
PHS 105: Principles of Physics
PHS 201: General Physics I

A minimum of 51 semester hours is required, including:
AVS 100: Introduction to Professional Aviation
AVS 101: Private Pilot Ground School
AVS 150: Aviation Meteorology
AVS 153: Private Pilot Flight Lab
AVS 201: Instrument Rating Ground School
AVS 202: Commercial Pilot Ground School
AVS 203: Introduction to Air Traffic Control
AVS 205: Global Positioning System and Glass Cockpit Lab
AVS 253: Instrument Rating Flight Lab
AVS 272: Commercial Pilot Flight Lab
AVS 273: Commercial Pilot Flight Lab II
AVS 274: Commercial Pilot Flight Lab III
AVS 306: Multi-Engine Rating Ground School
AVS 308: Aviation Safety
AVS 312: Aviation Law
AVS 317: Aircraft Power Plants
AVS 318: Advanced Aircraft Systems
AVS 376: Multi-Engine Rating Flight Lab
AVS 400: Aviation Professional Development
AVS 404: Crew Resource Management with Lab
AVS 405: Air Transportation Management
AVS 419: Air Carrier Operations

Three semester hours of upper-division aviation electives are also required. No internship is required, but is recommended. The first three credits of an internship will be graded. Additional credits up to a maximum of nine will be graded pass/fail.

Aviation Management Major

The following are required as part of the core curriculum courses:
MAT 131: Trigonometry and Applied Calculus
MAT 210: Probability and Statistics
PSY 101: General Psychology

Choose one of the following:
PHS 101: Fundamentals of Physics
PHS 105: Principles of Physics
PHS 201: General Physics I

A minimum of 55 semester hours is required, including:
ACC 210: Foundations of Accounting
AVS 100: Introduction to Professional Aviation
AVS 101: Private Pilot Ground School
AVS 150: Aviation Meteorology
AVS 170: Flight Training Observation Lab
AVS 307: FBO and General Aviation Operations
AVS 308: Aviation Safety
AVS 310: Airport Planning and Administration
AVS 312: Aviation Law
AVS 400: Aviation Professional Development
AVS 405: Air Transportation Management
AVS 450: Internship
BSA 101: Introduction to Business
BSA 303: Principles of Management
BSA 304: Principles of Marketing
BSA 311: Principles of Finance
ECO 205: Principles of Economics

Six semester hours of upper-division aviation or business electives are also required. Three credits of internship are required and will be graded. Additional credits up to a maximum of nine will be graded pass/fail. Internship credits may not be used for any part of the required six semester hours of upper-division electives.

Minor in Aeronautical Science

A minimum of 20 semester hours is required, including:
AVS 101: Private Pilot Ground School
AVS 150: Aviation Meteorology
AVS 153: Private Pilot Flight Lab
AVS 203: Introduction to Air Traffic Control
AVS 308: Aviation Safety

Five semester hours of aviation electives are required. At least three of the elective credits must be in upper-division courses.

Minor in Aircraft Dispatch

A minimum of 20 semester hours is required, including:
AVS 101: Private Pilot Ground School
AVS 150: Meteorology
AVS 203: Introduction to Air Traffic Control
AVS 318: Advanced Aircraft Systems
AVS 419: Air Carrier Operations
AVS 443: Airline Dispatcher Certification
AVS 447: Boeing 737 Aircraft Systems

Choose one of the following:
AVS 201: Instrument Pilot Ground School
AVS 224: Introduction to Instruments for Dispatchers

To obtain the minor, the student must obtain the FAA Aircraft Dispatcher certificate.

ACC 210 - Foundations of Accounting
Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 3
This course is designed to give students a basic understanding of the uses and limitations of accounting information, particularly from financial statements. Students will understand how to take information from the financial statements and make informed business decisions.
Prerequisite: BSA 101
AVS 100 - Introduction to Professional Aviation
Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 1
This course introduces students to the aviation curriculum and the liberal arts core curriculum as a foundation for personal growth and development. It investigates aviation career options with an emphasis on the necessary knowledge, skills, and attributes of an aviation professional. The course also introduces aviation safety and human factor issues. Learning activities include professional reading and writing.
AVS 101 - Private Pilot Ground School
Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 4
This course prepares the student for the FAA private pilot knowledge examination. The student is introduced to the principles of aerodynamics, aircraft systems and performance, meteorology and aviation weather data, aviation physiology, navigation, flight planning, and aviation decision-making.
Corequesite: AVS 153
AVS 118 - Introduction to Unmanned Aerial Systems
Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3
This course provides an overview of unmanned aircraft system (UAS) operations from a non-engineering civilian operational perspective. The course covers the history of UAS, then explores current technology and potential UAS developments in the future. The course examines all facets of UAS operations, including safety procedures and relevant human factors.
AVS 150 - Aviation Meteorology
Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 3
This course provides a detailed knowledge of the environmental factors critical to safe flight operations. The course covers weather systems, upper-air characteristics, flight hazards, weather-related topics in flight safety, meteorological flight planning, use of weather information systems, and the reports and charts used for aviation weather reporting and forecasting.
Prerequisite: AVS 101
AVS 153 - Private Pilot Flight Lab
Semester: Fall, Spring, and Summer
Semester hours: 2
Students complete all three stages of the private pilot flight syllabus. This course includes dual and solo flight and covers pre-flight preparation, aircraft operation procedures, proper aircraft flight control, air and ground safety, flight maneuvers, air traffic control procedures and communication, and VFR navigation. This course prepares students for the FAA private pilot oral and flight examinations. The FAA private pilot certificate must be completed to fulfill course requirements. This course must be completed within one year of completing AVS 101.
Corequesite: AVS 101
AVS 170 - Flight Training Observation Lab
Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 1
This course is for students majoring in aviation management. The course provides students with guided observation of private, instrument, commercial, multi-engine, and crew resource management flight training. It is designed to increase the student’s understanding of factors basic to flight operations, aviation meteorology, air traffic control, flight navigation, and the development of a professional pilot.
Prerequisite: AVS 101
AVS 200 - Intercollegiate Flight Team Competition
Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 1
Students train for and participate in intercollegiate flight competition as a member of the Rocky Mountain College Flight Team. An additional fee is required during semesters in which the team participates in competition.
AVS 201 - Instrument Rating Ground School
Semester: Fall, Spring, and Summer
Semester hours: 3
This course prepares students for the FAA instrument rating knowledge examination, providing an in-depth study of flight instruments, physiology of flight, aviation weather reports and forecasting, radio navigation, instrument departure, en route and arrival procedures, flight planning, and emergency procedures. Students may take AVS 201 or AVS 224, but not both.
Prerequisite: AVS 101, AVS 153; or permission of the director of aviation
Corequesite: AVS 205 and AVS 253
AVS 202 - Commercial Pilot Ground School
Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 3
This course prepares students for the FAA commercial pilot knowledge examination, covering meteorology, airspace, pilotage, aviation physiology, advanced aerodynamics, commercial
flight maneuvers, aircraft stability and performance, flight in complex aircraft, flight management and emergency procedures, and regulations related to commercial flight operations.
Prerequisite: AVS 201, AVS 253, or permission of the director of aviation
Corequesite: AVS 272
AVS 203 - Introduction to Air Traffic Control
Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3
This course provides a detailed study of the science of air traffic control for professional pilots and aviation managers. Topics include the national airspace system, air traffic control, navigation aids, communications and operations procedures, airport traffic control, radar operations, and ATC facility management.
Prerequisite: AVS 101
AVS 205 - Global Positioning System and Glass Cockpit Lab
Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 1
Students complete hands-on global positioning system and glass cockpit training using software in the classroom and hardware in flight training devices in order to integrate and apply these systems in instrument flight.
Prerequisite: AVS 101, AVS 153
Corequesite: AVS 201 and AVS 253
AVS 224 - Introduction to Instruments for Dispatchers
Semester: Fall, Spring, and Summer
Semester hours: 1
This course prepares students with the background in instrument flight and in-flight publications necessary to prepare for the aircraft dispatcher practical test. The course includes study of flight instruments, aviation weather reports and forecasting, instrument departure, en route and arrival procedures, and flight planning. Students may take AVS 201 or AVS 224, but not both.
Prerequisite: AVS 101
AVS 231 - Aviation History
Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3
This course outlines the evolution of aviation from early glider and balloon flights to modern jets and the space age. The course examines the multiple ways that technology and warfare have advanced aviation. Topics of study include specific flights, significant aviators, and particular aircraft that have improved general, commercial, and military aviation. The course discusses current developments and future trends in aviation.
AVS 243 - Aviation Winter Survival
Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 1
This course consists of a trip to another town in Montana for training over a weekend in January. The course includes classroom and field work on how to survive in winter conditions. Training includes staying in the field overnight for one night. There is a small fee, plus cost of travel and one night of lodging. Registration with the Montana Aeronautics Division, which is the sponsor, must be completed by December 1st. Pass/no pass grading.
Prerequisite: AVS 101
AVS 253 - Instrument Rating Flight Lab
Semester: Fall, Spring, and Summer
Semester hours: 2
Students complete all three stages of the instrument pilot flight syllabus, which includes instrument departure and en route and approach procedures in both the airplane and flight training device (simulator). This course prepares students for the FAA instrument rating oral and flight examinations. FAA instrument rating must be completed to fulfill course requirements. This course must be completed within one year of completing AVS 201.
Prerequisite: AVS 101 and AVS 153 or private pilot certificate
Corequesite: AVS 201 and AVS 205
AVS 272 - Commercial Pilot Flight Lab I
Semester: Fall, Spring, and Summer
Semester hours: 1
This course provides flight instruction covering commercial navigation, cross-country flights, and night-flying procedures, allowing students to complete stage one of the flight syllabus.
Prerequisite: AVS 253
Corequesite: AVS 202
AVS 273 - Commercial Pilot Flight Lab II
Semester: Fall, Spring, and Summer
Semester hours: 1
This course provides flight instruction covering commercial flight maneuvers, allowing students to complete stage two of the flight syllabus.
Prerequisite: AVS 272
AVS 274 - Commercial Pilot Flight Lab III
Semester: Fall, Spring, and Summer
Semester hours: 1
This course provides flight instruction providing a continuation of commercial flight maneuvers and complex aircraft flight procedures. Students complete stage three of the flight syllabus and become prepared for the FAA commercial pilot oral and flight examinations. The FAA commercial pilot certificate must be completed to fulfill course requirements. This course must be completed within one year of completing AVS 202.
Prerequisite: AVS 273
AVS 299 - Independent Study
Semester: On Demand
Semester hours: 1-3
This course allows a strong student to devise and pursue independent study in an area agreed upon in consultation with, and supervised by, a faculty member. Students should be either a major or minor and have a cumulative GPA of 3.00 or greater.
AVS 301 - Certified Flight Instructor Ground School
Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 3
This is a two-part course that prepares students for the FAA Fundamentals of Instruction and Flight Instructor Knowledge Examinations. Part one covers fundamentals of teaching and learning, including effective teaching methods, aerodynamics analysis, instructional syllabus development, and flight instructor responsibilities. Part two addresses the analysis of flight maneuvers involved in the private, commercial, and flight instructor certificates.
Prerequisite: AVS 202 and AVS 274; or permission of the director of aviation
AVS 306 - Multi-Engine Rating Ground School
Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 1
This course covers the operation of multi-engine airplanes including performance, normal and emergency operating procedures, electrical and hydraulic systems, and other installed equipment commonly found on multi-engine airplanes.
Prerequisite: AVS 202, AVS 273, or permission of the director of aviation
Corequesite: AVS 376
AVS 307 - FBO and General Aviation Operations
Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3
This course examines the factors involved in running a successful fixed base operation (FBO) and operating a general aviation business. The course includes the certification process, management operations, and marketing strategies. The course also studies the evolving role of FBOs, from their pilot-oriented roots to their business-oriented future.
AVS 308 - Aviation Safety
Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3
This course provides a forum for understanding the safe operation of aircraft. The focus is on human factors in the aviation safety environment. Topics of study include aircraft technology, human physiology, psychology, air traffic control, navigational facilities, weather, accident investigation, and crew resource management.
Prerequisite: sophomore standing, junior standing preferred
AVS 310 - Airport Planning and Administration
Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3
This course provides a forum for understanding the elements of proper airport planning and the importance of achieving a successful airport operation. The course studies the duties and responsibilities of an airport manager at a large airport, as well as departments such as crash/fire/rescue, facilities, administration, and maintenance. The course also covers the criteria for blending the airport into federal and state plans and for achieving FAA approval.
Prerequisite: sophomore standing, junior standing preferred
AVS 312 - Aviation Law
Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3
This course provides a forum for understanding the statutes, regulations, and case law governing aviation. Topics of study include administrative law, FAA enforcement, aviation medical issues, business organizations, airline liability, aircraft accidents, aircraft transactions, and airline labor law.
Prerequisite: sophomore standing
AVS 317 - Aircraft Power Plants
Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3
An in-depth study of reciprocating, turbine, and turbo-prop engines and propeller systems and the engine accessory equipment used on modern aircraft.
Prerequisite: AVS 202, PHS 101 or PHS 105 or PHS 201, or permission of professor
AVS 318 - Advanced Aircraft Systems
Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3
An in-depth study of advanced aircraft systems including fuel, hydraulic, electrical, engine accessory, and auxiliary systems.
Prerequisite: AVS 202 or permission of professor
AVS 325 - Advanced Flight Systems
Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3
This course provides an introduction to modern cockpit technology used in air transport aircraft. The course addresses the function and operation of glass cockpit aircraft operating equipment such as satellite-based and inertial navigation systems, auto-pilots, flight management systems, electronic flight information systems, ground proximity warning systems, traffic collision avoidance systems, datalink systems, electronic flight bags, weather radar, enhanced/synthetic vision systems, flight data, cockpit voice recording systems, and emergent technologies.
Prerequisite: AVS 201, AVS 253
AVS 343 - Altitude Chamber Training
Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 1
This course provides classroom instruction and hands-on training on the physiological effects and hazards associated with high altitude flight. The course includes a field trip to participate in training in an altitude chamber. Pass/no pass grading. There is a course fee.
Prerequisite: AVS 101, AVS 153
AVS 371 - Certified Flight Instructor Flight Lab
Semester: Fall, Spring, and Summer
Semester hours: 2
This course provides flight instruction, preparing students for the FAA flight instructor oral and flight examinations. The course includes dual flights covering all maneuvers necessary to instruct students for the private and commercial pilot certificates. The FAA flight instructor certificate must be completed to fulfill course requirements.
Prerequisite: AVS 274
Corequesite: AVS 301
AVS 372 - Instrument Flight Instructor
Semester: Fall, Spring, and Summer
Semester hours: 1
This course provides ground and flight instruction, preparing students for the FAA instrument flight instructor written, oral, and flight examinations. The FAA instrument instructor rating must be completed to fulfill course requirements.
Prerequisite: AVS 371
AVS 373 - Multi-Engine Flight Instructor
Semester: Fall, Spring, and Summer
Semester hours: 1
This course provides ground and flight instruction, preparing students for the FAA multi-engine flight instructor rating oral and flight examinations. The FAA multi-engine instructor rating must be completed to fulfill course requirements.
Prerequisite: AVS 371
AVS 376 - Multi-Engine Rating Flight Lab
Semester: Fall, Spring, and Summer
Semester hours: 1
This course provides flight instruction, preparing students for the FAA multi-engine rating oral and flight examinations. Areas covered include emergency procedures, single-engine operations, and control of the aircraft by sole reference to flight instruments. The FAA multi-engine rating must be completed to fulfill course requirements. This course must be completed within one year of completing AVS 306.
Prerequisite: AVS 274
Corequesite: AVS 306
AVS 400 - Aviation Professional Development
Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 1
This culminating course focuses on professional issues and integrates all facets of the student's college educational experience. Students explore issues in aviation including professional standards, ethics, and career advancement. Guest lectures will provide perspectives from leaders in the aviation industry. This course prepares the graduate for the transition to a career in aviation and develops job placement skills.
Prerequisite: senior standing
AVS 404 - Crew Resource Management with Lab
Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 2
This course provides advanced ground and simulator instruction with an emphasis on the application of aviation and human factors in crew resource management skills. The lab includes Line-Oriented Flight Training (LOFT) sessions in a flight-training device to develop crew resource management skills in a variety of realistic situations encountered by flight crews.
Prerequisite: AVS 376 or permission of the director of aviation
AVS 405 - Air Transportation Management
Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3
This course provides a comprehensive experience for the aviation student by examining the air transportation industry. Areas of concentration include airline operation, maintenance, marketing, and economic factors affecting the industry. The class uses a simulation program where students create an airline and then compete with other students.
Prerequisite: junior or senior standing
AVS 410 - Advanced Aerodynamics and Aircraft Performance
Semester: Spring; Alternate years
Semester hours: 3
This course covers advanced theories of flight and performance factors including airfoil shape; theories of lift and drag; velocity; power and thrust; stability and control; high speed aerodynamics; Mach effects; advanced principles of performance, capabilities, and limitations; performance design criteria; and load factors.
Prerequisite: PHS 101 or PHS 105; AVS 202 and MAT 131; AVS 274 is preferred
AVS 419 - Air Carrier Operations
Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3
This course focuses on a study of transport category, flight planning, airport analysis, advanced weather analysis, and economic and safety issues related to transport category aircraft operations, including HMR 175 and FAR Part 135 and 121 regulatory requirements. This course provides the knowledge required to qualify for the FAA airline transport pilot and aircraft dispatcher knowledge examinations.
Prerequisite: AVS 202
AVS 443 - Airline Dispatcher Certification
Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 2
This course is a culminating study of airline operations, preparing students for the FAA dispatcher certification knowledge and practical examinations. Students must be 21 years-of-age by the middle of the semester that the course is taken to meet FAA examination requirements.
Prerequisite: AVS 150, AVS 201, AVS 203, AVS 318, and AVS 419
AVS 447 - Boeing 737 Aircraft Systems
Semester: Fall, Spring, and Summer
Semester hours: 1
This course is an in-depth study of the systems of the Boeing 737 aircraft, including hydraulics, avionics, electrics, air conditioning, and flight controls. Students work with computer-based training software as used by numerous airlines. This independent study course is conducted and tested much like initial 737 ground training at an airline.
Prerequisite: AVS 202
Corequesite: AVS 318
AVS 449 - Regional Jet Aircraft Systems
Semester: Fall, Spring, and Summer
Semester hours: 1
This course is an in-depth study of the systems of the Canadair Regional Jet (CRJ) aircraft, including hydraulics, avionics, electrics, air conditioning, flight controls, etc. Students work with computer-based training software as used by numerous airlines. This independent study course is conducted and tested much like initial CRJ ground training at an airline.
Prerequisite: AVS 202
Corequesite: AVS 318
AVS 450 - Internship
Semester: Fall, Spring, and Summer
Semester hours: 1-12
This course is a guided work experience in an already established place of business. The student must arrange the internship in agreement with the instructor and the Office of Career Services. The internship should relate to the student's major or minor area of study. Contract is required.
Prerequisite: junior or senior standing and permission of the director of aviation
AVS 499 - Independent Study
Semester: On Demand
Semester hours: 1-3
This course allows a strong student to devise and pursue independent study in an area agreed upon in consultation with, and supervised by, a faculty member. Students should be either a major or minor and have a cumulative GPA of 3.00 or greater.
Prerequisite: junior or senior standing
BSA 101 - Introduction to Business
Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 3
A beginning business course designed to introduce students to the areas of business study, including historical foundations of America's free enterprise system, ethics and social responsibility in the business setting, entrepreneurship, the legal structures of business, marketing, and general management.
BSA 303 - Principles of Management
Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 3
Students examine the management functions and basic concepts and principles of management, including planning, organization, coordination, control, job design, and human resource management. Topics in human resource management include recruitment, selection, administration of personnel policies, and dismissals. This course is often required as a prerequisite for master’s-level business programs.
Prerequisite: ACC 210, ECO 205
BSA 304 - Principles of Marketing
Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 3
This course studies the marketing process from product development through consumer purchase. The course includes examination of consumer buying behavior, marketing channels, physical distribution, pricing policies, and promotion along with their role in the marketing process.
Prerequisite: ECO 205
BSA 311 - Principles of Finance
Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3
Students are introduced to the principles of business finance. Topics covered include financial analysis and planning, working capital management, the time value of money, and capital budgeting.
Prerequisite: ECO 205
ECO 205 - Principles of Economics
Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 3
This course will introduce the principles of firm-level decision making, consumer choices and their rationale, differing forms of industry competition, and how market-clearing prices and quantities are determined in a market environment. Additionally, the students will gain an understanding of how the major participants in the economy interact and what drives economic growth, interest rates, and inflation. The possible impacts of a variety of fiscal and monetary policy choices will be presented to assist the student in understanding how those policies will impact incomes, employment, and trade for a country. At the completion of the course, the student should have a basic understanding of both the microeconomic and macroeconomic environments and their impacts on businesses and the general population.
MAT 131 - Trigonometry and Applied Calculus
Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3
This course is available to aeronautical science majors and aviation management majors only. This course introduces applied trigonometry, vectors, and basic differential and integral calculus to model and solve real-world problems.
Prerequisite: MAT 100 or satisfactory score on a placement exam
MAT 210 - Probability and Statistics
Semester: Fall, Spring, and Summer
Semester hours: 3
This course provides a non-calculus-based study of discrete probability theory and its statistical applications. Distribution theory and its applications in hypothesis testing and setting confidence intervals are discussed.
Prerequisite: MAT 100 or satisfactory score on a placement exam
PHS 101 - Fundamental Physics I
Semester: Fall; Alternate years
Semester hours: 4
Students examine a survey of the laws and phenomena of classical physics, including motion, force, energy, momentum, waves, and thermodynamics. This course is suitable for non-science majors who have a strong background in high school algebra and who wish to have a more rigorous understanding of physics than provided in most courses for non-science majors. The course will satisfy the requirements of geology and biology majors. Students considering graduate work in these areas should take PHS 201 and PHS 202 instead. Three lecture periods and one two-hour laboratory per week.
PHS 105 - Principles of Physics
Semester: On Demand
Semester hours: 4
A survey of the laws and phenomena of classical physics, including motion, force, energy, momentum, waves, thermodynamics, and their application to aviation topics such as weight and balance, aerodynamics, aircraft maneuvering, g forces, braking, acceleration, and propellors. This course is algebra-based and is intended for aviation majors. Other admitted with permission of instructor when space allows. Course includes a laboratory.
Prerequisite: proficiency in high school algebra and trigonometry or MAT 110 or MAT 131
PHS 201 - General Physics I
Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 4
This course is a calculus-based introduction to the laws and phenomena of classical physics, including force and motion, energy and momentum, their conservation laws, and their oscillations. This sequence is required for chemistry majors and engineering students and is recommended for mathematics, biology, and geology students. Three lecture periods and one two-hour laboratory per week.
Corequesite: MAT 175
PSY 101 - General Psychology
Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 3
A survey of the field of psychology investigating such topics as learning, motivation, human development, personality, social psychology, and physiological psychology. In order to make inquiry into any academic discipline, the student must first learn the language and methodology of that discipline; the field of psychology is no exception. Therefore, this course will include the study of major psychological theories, terminology, and investigative methods, as well as limited opportunity to apply those methods.
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