Health and Human Performance

The health and human performance program examines the many dimensions of health and human performance. The major goal of the program is to enable students to make informed health decisions. The program prepares students to become competent entry-level professionals, as well as advanced study candidates.

To achieve these outcomes, the student will analyze the structure and function of the human body, apply physiological and biomechanical concepts to human movement, examine the acquisition of motor skills, explore the multi-dimensional nature of the health and human performance discipline, examine ethical issues and culturally diverse values related to the discipline, achieve the specific physical skills required to be competent in their profession, acquire a lifelong quest for knowledge, and develop a commitment to act responsibly in one's profession and on behalf of one's community.

The health and human performance program offers varied opportunities for guided work experiences with schools, hospitals, sports medicine clinics, wellness centers, corporate fitness programs, and fitness facilities. These capstone opportunities allow students to express their multidisciplinary education by applying creative problem-solving and communication skills in professional settings.

Learning Outcomes

Exercise Science
Students who graduate with a concentration in exercise science will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate the knowledge and skills needed for physical activity programming and lifestyle modification techniques;
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of history and broad content within exercise science and health topics and how that relates to health promotion;
  3. Demonstrate basic motor skills and patterns and apply a variety of concepts, theories, and methods common to human movement and health promotion;
  4. Apply the skills necessary to bridge the gap between theory and practice;
  5. Utilize statistical and measurement concepts to assess client performance and program effectiveness;
  6. Demonstrate professional and ethical decision-making skills and responsibility as it relates to health promotion and programming.
Sport Management
Students who graduate with a concentration in sport management will be able to:
  1. Understand the role of sports in society, how it influences our culture, and how sports have been influenced by culture;
  2. Demonstrate the ability and knowledge to be a leader in a sports-related work setting;
  3. Identify and address ethical issues related to sports management and administration;
  4. Understand the concepts of finance an budget and be able to apply them to the sports economy;
  5. Use communication and technology skills effectively and appropriately within the sports-related environment.

Major in Health and Human Performance

Two concentrations are offered under the health and human performance major:
Exercise Science
Sport Management

Exercise Science Concentraton

A minimum of 51 semester hours is required, including:
HHP 161: Foundations of Human Structure and Function
HHP 171: Nutrition
HHP 212: Health and Wellness
HHP 223: Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries
HHP 316: Motor Development and Learning
HHP 321: Biomechanics
HHP 347: Psychology of Physical Activity and Exercise
HHP 357: Physiology of Exercise
HHP 442: Measurement & Evaluation in Health Sciences
HHP 450: Internship (5 semester hours)
HHP 478: Therapeutic Exercise and Advanced Functional Training
HHP 490: Senior Seminar
Three semester hours chosen from PAC activities (in consultation with department faculty)

Choose one of the following:
HHP 324: Sport Performance and Recovery
HHP 477: Advanced Theories of Strength Training and Conditioning

*May substitute BIO 321 Anatomy and Physiology for HHP 161: Foundations of Human Structure and Function.

*First aid/ CPR certification required before graduation.

Sport Management Concentration

A minimum of 38 semester hours is required, including:
ACC 210: Foundations of Accounting
BSA 101: Introduction to Business
BSA 303: Principles of Management
BSA 304: Principles of Marketing
BSA 362: Professional Sales
BSA/HHP 450: Internship
COM 306: Organizational Communication
ECO 205: Principles of Economics
ENG 325: Professional Writing
HHP 245: Introduction to Sports Management
HHP 300: Current Issues and Practices in Coaching
HHP 412: Management of Health Enhancement and Sport Programs
HHP 424: Contemporary and Ethical Issues in Sports

Major in Health and Human Performance K-12 Education

A minimum of 45 semester hours is required, including:
COM 102: Public Speaking
EDC 341: Methods and Materials: Teaching Health in the Elementary School
EDC 342: Methods and Materials: Teaching Physical Education in the Elementary School
PAC 108: Swimming
HHP 108: Professional Activities
HHP 171: Nutrition
HHP 212: Health and Wellness Theories and Application
HHP 223: Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries
HHP 316: Motor Development and Learning
HHP 412: Management of Health Enhancement and Sport Programs
HHP 420: Methods and Materials: Teaching Secondary Health Enhancement

Choose one of the following:
BIO 321: Human Anatomy and Physiology
HHP 161: Foundations of Human Structure and Function

Choose two of the following:
HHP 321: Biomechanics
HHP 357: Physiology of Exercise
HHP 442: Measurement & Evaluation in Health Sciences

*First aid/ CPR certification required before graduation

This option meets Montana's health certification requirements. In addition, students must complete the professional education program for K-12 education majors as described in the "Education" section of the catalog. Students seeking an endorsement in K-12 physical education must earn a minimum grade of "C" in all required HHP courses, including prerequisites.

Minor in Athletic Training

A minimum of 22 semester hours is required, including:
HHP 161: Foundations of Human Structure and Functions
HHP 212: Health and Wellness Theories and Application
HHP 223: Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries
HHP 478: Therapeutic Exercise and Advanced Functional Training

*First aid/ CPR certification required before graduation

Also required:
Complete 3 athletic training practicums

Minor in Coaching

A minimum of 28 semester hours is required, including:
HHP 223: Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries
HHP 300: Current Issues and Practices in Coaching
HHP 316: Motor Development and Learning
HHP 321: Biomechanics
HHP 357: Physiology of Exercise
HHP 348: Sports Psychology
HHP 412: Management of Health Enhancement and Sport Program

Choose two of the following:
HHP 301: Officiating High School Sports
HHP 302: Basketball Coaching
HHP 303: Football Coaching
HHP 305: Track and Field Coaching
HHP 306: Volleyball Coaching
HHP 307: Baseball and Softball Coaching
HHP 308: Strength and Conditioning Coaching
HHP 311: Soccer Coaching

*First aid/ CPR certification required before graduation

Many state education departments do not require a coach to be a certified teacher but do require that coaches meet qualification standards. This option prepares students to meet those qualification standards.

Minor in Exercise Science

A minimum of 24 hours is required, including:
HHP 161: Foundations of Human Structure and Function
HHP 171: Nutrition
HHP 212: Health and Wellness Theories and Application
HHP 223: Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries

Please choose two of the following courses:
HHP 316: Motor Development and Learning
HHP 321: Biomechanics
HHP 324: Sport Performance, Nutrition, and Recovery
HHP 347: Psychology of Physical Activity and Exercise
HHP 356 (4 cr): Physiology of Exercise
HHP 442: Measurement & Evaluation in Health Sciences
HHP 477: Advanced Theories of Strength Training and Conditioning
HHP 478: Therapeutic Exercise and Advanced Functional Training

Pre-professional Athletic Training (3+2 program with MSU-B)

The 3+2 Athletic Training Program allows students to complete three years of course requirements at Rocky Mountain College and then transfer to MSU Billings (MSUB) and enroll in the two-year entry-level master's program in athletic training. After successful completion of the first year at MSUB, the student will be awarded a bachelor’s degree from Rocky Mountain College. After completing the program at MSUB, the student will be awarded the Master of Athletic Training degree. Students entering this program at RMC must major in exercise science and minor in athletic training and must complete the pre-requisites for the master’s program at MSUB.

Required courses:
Exercise science:
HHP 171: Nutrition
HHP 212: Health and Wellness Theory and Application
HHP 223: Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries
HHP 316: Motor Development and Learning
HHP 321: Biomechanics
HHP 347: Psychology of Physical Activity and Exercise
HHP 357: Physiology of Exercise
HHP 442: Measurement & Evaluation in Health Sciences
HHP 477: Advanced Theories in Strength Training and Conditioning
HHP 478: Therapeutic Exercise and Advanced Functional Training

Choose one of the following:
HHP 181: Athletic Training Field Practicum
HHP 182: Athletic Training Field Practicum
HHP 281: Athletic Training Field Practicum
HHP 282: Athletic Training Field Practicum
HHP 381: Athletic Training Field Practicum
HHP 382: Athletic Training Field Practicum
HHP 481: Athletic Training Field Practicum
HHP 482: Athletic Training Field Practicum

Also required:
BIO 321: Anatomy and Physiology 1
BIO 322: Anatomy and Physiology 2
PHA 247: Medical Terminology
First aid/ CPR certification

Note:
BIO 321: Human Anatomy and Physiology I requires the following courses as prerequisites: BIO 120 and CHM 101 and CHM 102.

*The following courses are prerequisites for the graduate program:
PSY 101: General Psychology
MAT 210: Probability and Statistics

- PEH Activities
Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 1
Select from a variety of activities. A specific activity may be taken twice for credit. Pass/no pass grading. No more than eight PE activity credits may count toward graduation. This rule does not apply to activities required in a HHP major.

PAC 101: Strength Conditioning for Football
PAC 102: Weight Conditioning for Football
PAC 103: Conditioning for Men's Basketball
PAC 104: Conditioning for Women's Basketball
PAC 105: Strength Conditioning for Skiers
PAC 106: Conditioning for Soccer
PAC 107: Conditioning for Volleyball
PAC 108: Swimming
PAC 109: Step/Pilates/Water Aerobics
PAC 110: Cardio Resistance Training
PAC 111: Karate
PAC 112: Team Activities
PAC 113: Racquet Sports
PAC 114: Scuba
PAC 115: Strength Training for Women
PAC 116: Fitness for Life
PAC 117: Hiking/Photography Weekend in Yellowstone
PAC 118: Bicycle in the Beartooths
PAC 119: Winter Break Ski Adventure
PAC 120: Leave No Trace Camping
PAC 121: Wilderness First Aid
PAC 122: Big Sky Ski Weekend
PAC 123: Red Lodge Ski Weekend
PAC 124: Beginning Ski/Snowboarding
PAC 125: Hot Springs/Geysers in Yellowstone
PAC 126: Rock Climbing
PAC 127: Cross Country Ski Weekend
PAC 128: Ice Climbing
PAC 129: Kayaking
PAC 130: Fly Fishing
PAC 131: Yoga
PAC 132: Beginning Tennis
PAC 133: Aikido
ACC 210 - Foundations of Accounting
Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 3
This course is designed to give students a basic understanding of the uses and limitations of accounting information, particularly from financial statements. Students will understand how to take information from the financial statements and make informed business decisions.
Prerequisite: BSA 101
BIO 321 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I
Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 4
A course requiring students to incorporate concepts from physics, chemistry, and biology to understand the interface between human structure and function and the regulatory mechanisms in play. Topics include tissue types, skeletal, muscular, nervous, respiratory, and reproductive anatomy and physiology. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory session per week. Human cadavers are used in the laboratory.
Prerequisite: BIO 120 and CHM 101 and CHM 102. CHM 251 and CHM 252 and PHS 102 or PHS 202 are highly recommended.
BSA 101 - Introduction to Business
Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 3
A beginning business course designed to introduce students to the areas of business study, including historical foundations of America's free enterprise system, ethics and social responsibility in the business setting, entrepreneurship, the legal structures of business, marketing, and general management.
BSA 303 - Principles of Mangement
Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 3
Students examine the management functions and basic concepts and principles of management, including planning, organization, coordination, control, job design, and human resource management. Topics in human resource management include recruitment, selection, administration of personnel policies, and dismissals. This course is often required as a prerequisite for master’s-level business programs.
Prerequisite: ACC 210, ECO 205
BSA 304 - Principles of Marketing
Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 3
This course studies the marketing process from product development through consumer purchase. The course includes examination of consumer buying behavior, marketing channels, physical distribution, pricing policies, and promotion along with their role in the marketing process.
Prerequisite: BSA 101, ECO 205
BSA 362 - Professional Sales
Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3
This course teaches the basic concepts required to become successful in the field of sales, focusing primarily on business-to-business selling. It includes such topics as understanding the sales cycle, how to make successful sales presentations, understanding the importance of relationships in the sales process, handling objections, and how to close.
Prerequisite: BSA 304
BSA 450 - Internship
Semester: On Demand
Semester hours: 1-12
Guided work experience and study of a professional nature in an established business, government agency, or other institution. Contract is required. A minimum of three semester hours is required, but no more than three semester hours will count toward the major.
Prerequisite: ACC 309, BSA 303, BSA 311
COM 102 - Public Speaking
Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 3
This course examines key aspects of writing and delivering public speeches. Focal topics include audience analysis, speech organization, developing supporting materials, argumentation, and delivery. By the end of the course, students will have written and delivered informative, persuasive, and ceremonial speeches.
COM 306 - Organizational Communication
Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3
This course examines how communication occurs in large cooperative networks, especially in professional work settings. It focuses on the roles leadership, management, and conflict resolution play in larger organizations. By the end of the course, students will understand how the values and cultures of any organization emerge through communication.
Prerequisite: COM 102 or permission of instructor
ECO 205 - Principles of Economics
Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 3
This course will introduce the principles of firm-level decision making, consumer choices and their rationale, differing forms of industry competition, and how market-clearing prices and quantities are determined in a market environment. Additionally, the students will gain an understanding of how the major participants in the economy interact and what drives economic growth, interest rates, and inflation. The possible impacts of a variety of fiscal and monetary policy choices will be presented to assist the student in understanding how those policies will impact incomes, employment, and trade for a country. At the completion of the course, the student should have a basic understanding of both the microeconomic and macroeconomic environments and their impacts on businesses and the general population.
EDC 341 - Methods and Materials: Teaching Health in the Elementary School
Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 2
This course provides competency in the delivery and evaluation of planned learning programs for elementary school children. Content will include knowledge of the purpose and scope of a health curriculum, appropriate health topics, and lesson planning. Multimedia based learning will be examined.
Prerequisite: admission to the teacher education program
EDC 342 - Methods and Materials: Teaching Physical Education in the Elementary School
Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 2
This course provides competency in the delivery and evaluation of planned learning programs for elementary school children. Content will include knowledge of the physiological, psychological, and motor developmental needs of elementary-age children and the implication for curriculum development and implementation. This course includes experience working with children in an on-campus Saturday morning program.
Prerequisite: admission to teacher education program
ENG 325 - Professional Writing
Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3
This course teaches concepts, practices, and skills for communicating technical, scientific, or business-related information. Topics include understanding how people read, designing documents, incorporating graphics, writing about statistical results, rewriting, editing, and using the Internet. This course may be especially useful for non-English majors, providing them with the tools and techniques to communicate their messages effectively.
Prerequisite: ENG 119
HHP 100 - Varsity Sports
Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 1
Students can elect to obtain credit for conditioning and participation in varsity sports.
HHP 108 - Professional Activities
Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3
This course is designed to introduce and direct students toward a level of proficiency in team-sports activities, individual sport activities, and in lifetime and fitness activities.
Within each activity students will be assessed by their growth in skill level, rule knowledge, and strategic application. Activities include orienteering, ultimate frisbee, cooperative activities, American Indian and multi¬cultural games, fitness testing, educational gymnastics, soccer, team handball, badminton, pickleball, and others.
HHP 161 - Foundations of Human Structure and Function
Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 4
Students examine the basic foundations and functions of the human body, including the skeletal, muscular, nervous, cardiovascular, digestive, and respiratory systems. Laboratory experiences focus on the nomenclature, structure, and function of these systems.
HHP 171 - Nutrition
Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 4
This course focuses on the essential nutrients and their principal sources and functions; the assessment, analysis, and modification of dietary intake; the relationship between nutrition and fitness; and the stages of the life cycle. This is not a chemistry-based course.
HHP 181 - Athletic Training Field Practicum
Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 2
Students complete 100 clinical hours under the supervision of a certified trainer.
Corequesite: HHP 222
HHP 182 - Athletic Training Field Practicum
Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 2
Students complete 100 clinical hours under the supervision of a certified trainer.
Corequesite: HHP 222
HHP 212 - Health and Wellness Theories and Applications
Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 4
Topics covered in this course include community/environmental health, consumer issues, death and dying, healthy lifestyles, infectious diseases, medical ethics, psychological health, risk factor management, sexuality, and substance abuse.
HHP 223 - Beginning Athletic Training
Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 4
Students learn procedures and practices in prevention, immediate care, treatment, and rehabilitation of injuries and sudden illness. Topics include taping, bandaging, and conditioning for athletic competition.
HHP 245 - Introduction to Sports Management
Semester: Fall; Even years
Semester hours: 3
This course is an introduction to the field of sports management that includes business aspects, an overview of the governance of both collegiate and professional sports, the role of sports managers, and an evaluation of sports management as a career.
HHP 281 - Athletic Training Field Practicum
Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 2
Students complete 200 clinical hours under the supervision of a certified trainer.
Corequesite: HHP 222
HHP 282 - Athletic Training Field Practicum
Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 2
Students complete 200 clinical hours under the supervision of a certified trainer.
Corequesite: HHP 222
HHP 299 - Independent Study
Semester: On Demand
Semester hours: 1-3
This course allows a superior student to devise and pursue independent study in an area agreed upon in consultation with, and supervised by, a faculty member. Students should be either a major or minor and have a cumulative GPA of 3.00 or greater.
HHP 300 - Current Issues and Practices in Coaching
Semester: Spring; Odd years
Semester hours: 2
Topics covered in this course include philosophy, sport psychology and sociology, and team management skills. Course includes ACEP certification materials.
HHP 301 - Officiating High School Sports
Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 2
Students demonstrate knowledge and practical skills in officiating a minimum of three high school sports from the following: football, soccer, volleyball, basketball, softball, and wrestling. Upon successful completion of the course, students can be certified by the Montana Officials Association, which permits immediate employment as middle school, high school, or youth sports officials.
HHP 302 - Basketball Coaching
Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 2
Coaching theories of basketball are examined, including fundamentals, techniques, strategies, practice sessions, utilization of personnel, and the ethics of coaching.
HHP 303 - Football Coaching
Semester: Fall; Even years
Semester hours: 2
Coaching theories of football are examined, including skills, systems of play, practice sessions, strategies, conditioning, personnel utilization, off-season programs, and the ethics of coaching.
HHP 305 - Track and Field Coaching
Semester: On Demand
Semester hours: 2
Students examine the following topics: mechanical analysis of track and field events; conditioning and training methods; teaching, coaching, and officiating techniques including practical experience in these areas; and management of track and field meets.
HHP 306 - Volleyball Coaching
Semester: Fall; Even years
Semester hours: 2
This course covers mechanical analysis and study of coaching theories, including but not limited to, skills, strategies, and systems of play.
HHP 307 - Baseball and Softball Coaching
Semester: On Demand
Semester hours: 2
Theories of coaching baseball and softball are examined, including skills, strategies, practice sessions, conditioning, teaching, and coaching the young athlete.
HHP 308 - Strength and Conditioning Coaching
Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 2
This course allows for experiential learning of current concepts in strength and conditioning. Additionally, it allows the opportunity to apply scientific knowledge of how to properly train athletes and clients for the primary goals of improving athletic performance and fitness. This course assists students in preparing for a profession in personal training and/or strength and conditioning.
HHP 311 - Soccer Coaching
Semester: On Demand
Semester hours: 2
Theories of coaching soccer are examined, including skills, strategies, practice sessions, conditioning, teaching, and coaching the young athlete.
HHP 316 - Motor Development and Learning
Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 4
This course focuses on the factors that influence the learning of motor skills. Content includes features of skill development, processes of perception, and components of action as these relate to the acquisition and teaching of goal-directed movement. Practical application of theory is a central part of the course.
HHP 321 - Biomechanics
Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 4
This course focuses on the principles of human movement. Emphasis is placed on demonstrating the ability to analyze human motion in terms of improving human movement performance. Concepts of biological/mechanical aspects of musculoskeletal structures are also included.
Prerequisite: BIO 321 or HHP 161
HHP 324 - Sport Performance and Recovery
Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3
The course provides a broad overview of physical performance enhancement. Ergogenic aids are anything believed to improve performance, and by the end of this course, students will be knowledgeable about ergogenic aids now in existence and feel comfortable determining their use in improving performance. The course provides an overview of: 1) what are ergogenic aids; 2) dietary supplements; 3) regulation of dietary supplements; 4) the merits of nutritional supplements; 5) general nutritional strategies to optimize performance and recovery; and 6) an overview of our current understanding of the ergogenics for performance enhancement. Students learn principles of pre- and post-exercise nutrition and nutrient timing, energy sources, and training regimes. Other topics include over-the-counter supplements, chemical ergogenic aids, and ethical issues.
Prerequisite: HHP 211 or permission of the instructor
HHP 342 - Methods and Materials: Teaching Physical Education in the Elementary School
Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3
This course provides competency in the delivery and evaluation of planned learning programs for elementary school children. Content will include knowledge of the physiological, psychological, and motor developmental needs of elementary-age children and the implication for curriculum development and implementation. This course includes experience working with children in an on-campus Saturday morning program.
Prerequisite: admission to teacher education program or permission of instructor; this course is for PE majors only
HHP 347 - Psychology of Physical Activity and Exercise
Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 4
The purpose of this course is to promote understanding of psychological theory, research, and intervention strategies in psychology of physical activity and exercise. In studying both theory and practice, students are expected to develop their own views and ideas within the realm of their chosen field. The exchange and development of ideas is encouraged and at the same time grounded in the current knowledge base in this field. Students are expected to undertake extensive reviews within various health fields.
HHP 348 - Sports Psychology
Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 3
Sport psychology is the scientific study of people and their behavior in sport and is concerned with the psychological determinants of behavior in movement situations, as well as the psychological effects of sport engagement. This course will address the fundamental areas within sports psychology, including, but not be limited to, the following topics: motivation, attributions, imagery, goal setting, confidence, attentional focus, team cohesion, leadership, anxiety, and stress. Students taking this course will be expected to demonstrate understanding of, and the application of, the topic when coaching children and youth.
HHP 357 - Physiology of Exercise
Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 4
Students explore the effects of exercise on the cardiorespiratory and neuromuscular systems. Physiological aspects of various training methods are examined. Laboratory experience is included.
HHP 381 - Athletic Training Field Practicum
Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 2
Students complete 200 clinical hours under the supervision of a certified trainer.
Prerequisite: HHP 281 or HHP 282
Corequesite: HHP 322
HHP 382 - Athletic Training Field Practicum
Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 2
Students complete 200 clinical hours under the supervision of a certified trainer.
Prerequisite: HHP 281 or HHP 282
Corequesite: HHP 322
HHP 412 - Management of Health Enhancement and Sport Programs
Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3
Students explore the organization, supervision, and administration of various health enhancement and sport programs.
HHP 420 - Methods and Materials: Teaching Secondary Health Enhancement
Semester: On Demand
Semester hours: 3
This course requires focused study and consultation with a public school physical education and health teacher or other acceptable professional. Hours will be arranged in consultation with the content area professor, the secondary education professor, the student, and the professional mentor. This course provides competence for delivery and evaluation of planned learning activities. Areas of concentration include emotional/mental health, healthy lifestyles, nutrition, weight control, community/environmental health, medical ethical issues, team and individual activities, lifetime sports, cooperative games, and fitness activities.
Prerequisite: admission to the teacher education program, senior standing, HHP 106, HHP 107, HHP 210, and HHP 211 and EDC 040
HHP 424 - Contemporary and Ethical Issues in Sports
Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 3
This capstone course covers issues of concern in sports today, such as substance abuse, gender issues, Title IX's impact on college sports, sportsmanship, standards of morality, questions of value, and rightness and wrongness.
Prerequisite: junior or senior standing
HHP 442 - Measurement & Evaluation in Health Sciences
Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 4
This course is designed to introduce students to, and engage them in, the process of measurement and evaluation as applied to the fields of health enhancement and exercise science. The course introduces students to the application of statistics, tests and measurement, report compilation, and interpretation of data. Students examine various types of assessment and test instrument design.
HHP 450 - Internship
Semester: On Demand
Semester hours: 1-12
This is a guided work experience in cooperation with an established health-related program. Forty-five hours of experience on the job are required for one hour of credit. Students in the exercise science option are required to earn eight credits in an off-campus program. The student must arrange the internship in agreement with the instructor and the Office of Career Services. Contract is required.
Prerequisite: junior or senior standing
HHP 477 - Advanced Theories of Strength Training and Conditioning
Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 4
This course is designed to provide a comprehensive overview of strength and conditioning. Emphasis is placed on the exercise sciences (including anatomy, exercise physiology, and biomechanics) and nutrition, exercise technique, program design, organization and administration, and testing and evaluation. Additionally, this course is designed to prepare students for the nationally accredited Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) certification exam, as well as other certification tests (CPT, ACSM, etc.)
Prerequisite: HHP 320 and HHP 356
HHP 478 - Therapeutic Exercise and Advanced Functional Training
Semester: Spring; Odd years
Semester hours: 4
This courses main purpose is to study the basic types of exercises applied in the treatment of disease and injury. This course is designed to explain the principles and apply the techniques of therapeutic exercise as they relate to athletic injury and disease. The advanced functional training portion will identify key movements required in athletics. This course will allow for someone to apply their knowledge in designing a program from the initial moment of injury throughout the healing process until someone can safely return to play.
Corequesite: HHP 161 and HHP 222
HHP 481 - Athletic Training Field Practicum
Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 2
Students complete 200 clinical hours under the supervision of a certified trainer.
Prerequisite: HHP 281 or HHP 282
Corequesite: HHP 322
HHP 482 - Athletic Training Field Practicum
Semester: Spring
Semester hours: 2
Students complete 200 clinical hours under the supervision of a certified trainer.
Prerequisite: HHP 281 or HHP 282
Corequesite: HHP 322
HHP 490 - Senior Seminar
Semester: Fall
Semester hours: 2
This course encourages senior students in health and physical education to develop job marketing and search skills, as well as prepare for graduate school or a professional career.
HHP 499 - Independent Study
Semester: On Demand
Semester hours: 1-3
This course allows a superior student to devise and pursue independent study in an area agreed upon in consultation with, and supervised by, a faculty member. Students should be either a major or minor and have a cumulative GPA of 3.00 or greater.
Prerequisite: junior or senior standing
PHA 247 - Medical Terminology
Semester: On Demand
Semester hours: 2
Open to any student. This course assists those studying in the fields of medicine and health care. Through textbook readings and the use of Web-related tools, the principles of medical terminology will be described and applied. The course offers a broad introduction to concepts underlying medical terminology. Medical examples will illustrate concepts and methods. This course does not meet core curriculum requirements.
PSY 101 - General Psychology
Semester: Fall and Spring
Semester hours: 3
A survey of the field of psychology investigating such topics as learning, motivation, human development, personality, social psychology, and physiological psychology. In order to make inquiry into any academic discipline, the student must first learn the language and methodology of that discipline; the field of psychology is no exception. Therefore, this course will include the study of major psychological theories, terminology, and investigative methods, as well as limited opportunity to apply those methods.
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